econintersect.com
       
  

FREE NEWSLETTER: Econintersect sends a nightly newsletter highlighting news events of the day, and providing a summary of new articles posted on the website. Econintersect will not sell or pass your email address to others per our privacy policy. You can cancel this subscription at any time by selecting the unsubscribing link in the footer of each email.



posted on 25 May 2016

The Macro Effects Of The Recent Swing In Financial Conditions

from Liberty Street Economics

-- this post authored by Marco Del Negro, Marc Giannoni, and Micah Smith

Credit conditions tightened considerably in the second half of 2015 and U.S. growth slowed. We estimate the extent to which tighter credit conditions last year were responsible for the slowdown using the FRBNY DSGE model. We find that growth would have slowed substantially more had the Federal Reserve not delayed liftoff in the federal funds rate.

The chart below shows the evolution of credit conditions, as measured by the spread between Baa yields and ten-year Treasury bond yields. One can see that spreads rose considerably from 2015:Q2 to 2016:Q1. This increase was largely unexpected. For instance, the FRBNY DSGE model was forecasting a modest decrease over the coming year as of 2015:Q2 (see the red line). The June 1, 2015, Blue Chip Financial Forecasts consensus was projecting essentially the same decline in spreads.

Credit Spread

Increases in credit spreads tend to be associated with subsequent slowdowns in economic activity, with the Great Recession being a salient example. In part, such increases reflect investors' concerns about future economic conditions, changes in firms' leverage, heightened worries about borrowers' default, and so on. However, as Simon Gilchrist and Egon Zakrajšek and others have shown in their research, such increases in credit spreads often cause an economic slowdown. A natural question is then: Did the rise in credit spreads reflect deteriorating economic conditions or did the causality run the other way around in this episode?

To answer this question, we need an economic model that can disentangle the various channels at work. We use the FRBNY DSGE model, which is a very stylized representation of reality that formalizes key interactions among critical economic actors such as households, firms, the financial sector, and the government. The model is then estimated using Bayesian methods, combining prior information about parameters with important macroeconomic data.

The model attributes most of the increase in spreads from 2015:Q3 to 2016:Q1 to unexpected disturbances - which we will refer to as "financial shocks." These shocks reflect developments that are not fully captured by the model. In late 2015, these developments include a downward revision in the foreign outlook and the deteriorating creditworthiness of the U.S. energy sector owing to the drop in energy prices.

How restrictive, then, has this rise in credit spreads been on the U.S. economy? The left panel in the next chart shows actual growth, from 2013:Q1 to 2016:Q1, in blue. After peaking at 3.9 percent (annual rate) in 2015:Q2, GDP growth slowed markedly for the subsequent three quarters, reaching a paltry 0.5 percent in 2016:Q1. Part of the slowdown was anticipated as of mid-2015: The red line, which indicates the 2015:Q2 forecast, shows that growth was expected to return to just below 2 percent. It just ended up being significantly lower.

real-gdp-growth

The right panel attributes the forecast "miss" - the difference between the blue and the red lines in the left panel - to the various sources of disturbance in the model. Focusing on the effects on growth of the tightening in credit conditions, the blue line in the right panel captures the contribution of the financial shocks that we discussed earlier. These shocks, which are behind the rise in credit spreads, subtracted more than a percentage point from growth (annualized) in each of 2015:Q3, 2015:Q4, and 2016:Q1.

Financial conditions loosened after February 2016, bringing credit spreads back down sharply. Thanks to this reversal in credit spreads, the restrictive effect on GDP growth in the current quarter (2016:Q2) is expected to be much more modest than it would otherwise have been. Had the credit spread reverted to its normal level at its typical pace from February on, it would likely have subtracted another half a percentage point from GDP growth for the rest of 2016, according to the model (see the blue dashed line).

The right panel of the chart above also shows that the tightening in financial condition is not solely responsible for the recent slowdown in GDP growth. Indeed, as indicated by the red line, other shocks subtracted almost 1.5 percentage points from output growth in 2016:Q1. (These shocks reflect various temporary factors, whose effects vanish after 2016:Q1.)

Why did GDP growth not fall by more, then, with such a powerful combination of adverse shocks? According to the model, the answer lies in large part with monetary policy. Recall that as of 2015:Q2, the federal funds rate was expected to rise. For instance, in the March and June 2015 Summary of Economic Projections, the median "dot" for the federal funds rate target was between 0.5 percent and 0.75 percent for the end of 2015. The FRBNY DSGE model was projecting a similar increase, as indicated in the chart below. Both the June 1 and the July 1, 2015, Blue Chip Financial Forecasts projected the policy rate to be 0.5 percent on average in 2015:Q4. However, the FOMC decided to delay liftoff of the federal funds rate. In September 2015, it maintained the target range for the federal funds rate unchanged, citing that "recent global economic and financial developments may restrain economic activity somewhat and are likely to put further downward pressure on inflation in the near term." The federal funds rate has remained considerably lower than had been forecast in the spring of 2015.

Federal Funds Rate

The model suggests that by maintaining the federal funds rate lower, the FOMC managed to substantially offset the effect of tightening financial conditions on the economy. As financial markets revised downward their expectations of interest rate renormalization, the rate at which firms and households could borrow remained low in spite of the increase in spreads. The gold line in the "Shock Decomposition" panel above suggests that the lower federal funds rate path managed to boost GDP growth by more than 1 percentage point for several quarters, essentially offsetting the negative effect of the tightening in financial conditions. In addition, FOMC communication early in 2016 was likely an important factor in the renormalization of financial conditions, although this is not well captured by the model.

In conclusion, the tightening in financial conditions reflected in the rapid rise in credit spreads from 2015:Q3 to 2016:Q1 caused a significant slowdown in growth, according to the FRBNY DSGE model. By delaying the federal funds rate liftoff, the FOMC managed to offset part of these adverse shocks. It is important to remember, however, that our analysis relies on a model that is necessarily a stylized representation of reality. As such, model implications need to be taken with caution.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this post are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors.

Source

http://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2016/05/the-macro-effects-of-the-recent-swing-in-financial-conditions.html#.V0WJL5ErKUk


About the Authors

Del Negro MarcoMarco Del Negro is an assistant vice president in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's Research and Statistics Group.

Giannoni MarcMarc Giannoni is an assistant vice president in the Group.

Smith_micahMicah Smith is a senior research analyst in the Group.

>>>>> Scroll down to view and make comments <<<<<<

Click here for Historical News Post Listing










Make a Comment

Econintersect wants your comments, data and opinion on the articles posted.  As the internet is a "war zone" of trolls, hackers and spammers - Econintersect must balance its defences against ease of commenting.  We have joined with Livefyre to manage our comment streams.

To comment, using Livefyre just click the "Sign In" button at the top-left corner of the comment box below. You can create a commenting account using your favorite social network such as Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn or Open ID - or open a Livefyre account using your email address.



You can also comment using Facebook directly using he comment block below.





Econintersect Contributors


search_box

Print this page or create a PDF file of this page
Print Friendly and PDF


The growing use of ad blocking software is creating a shortfall in covering our fixed expenses. Please consider a donation to Econintersect to allow continuing output of quality and balanced financial and economic news and analysis.


Take a look at what is going on inside of Econintersect.com
Main Home
Analysis Blog
Joan Robinson’s Critique of Marginal Utility Theory
The Truth About Trade Agreements - and Why We Need Them
News Blog
The Universities Churning Out The Most Billionaires
Five Amazing Ways Plants Have Created New Technologies
Where U.S. Weekly Wages Go The Furthest
What We Read Today 09 December 2016
How To Stop Using Filler Words Like Um And Uh
02 December 2016: ECRI's WLI Growth Index Improvement Continues
Preliminary December 2016 Michigan Consumer Sentiment Highest Since Early 2015
October 2016 Wholesale Sales Improved
Rail Week Ending 03 December 2016: Finally A Positive Month
November 2016 CBO Monthly Budget Review: Total Receipts Up by 1 Percent in the First Two Months of Fiscal Year 2017
Infographic Of The Day: Copyright - Illegal Download
Early Headlines: Asia Stocks Mixed, Oil Steady, Bank Mafia, Trump To Remain TV Producer, US Life Expectancy Down, India Stocks Suffering, Park Impeached, China Struggles To Support Yuan And More
Heavy Metal And Hard Rock Albums That Went Certified Diamond Status
Investing Blog
Investing,com Weekly Wrap-up 09 December 2016
Are Your Trade Entries Patient Enough?
Opinion Blog
Looking At Everything: Trump's $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan
The Global Financial Mess Is Due To Political Failure
Precious Metals Blog
Silver Prices Rebounded Today: Where They Are Headed
Live Markets
09Dec2016 Market Close: Wall Street Closes On A New High, Trump Sugar High, Crude Prices Testing Resistance, US Dollar Melts Higher
Amazon Books & More






.... and keep up with economic news using our dynamic economic newspapers with the largest international coverage on the internet
Asia / Pacific
Europe
Middle East / Africa
Americas
USA Government



Crowdfunding ....






























 navigate econintersect.com

Blogs

Analysis Blog
News Blog
Investing Blog
Opinion Blog
Precious Metals Blog
Markets Blog
Video of the Day
Weather

Newspapers

Asia / Pacific
Europe
Middle East / Africa
Americas
USA Government
     

RSS Feeds / Social Media

Combined Econintersect Feed
Google+
Facebook
Twitter
Digg

Free Newsletter

Marketplace - Books & More

Economic Forecast

Content Contribution

Contact

About

  Top Economics Site

Investing.com Contributor TalkMarkets Contributor Finance Blogs Free PageRank Checker Active Search Results Google+

This Web Page by Steven Hansen ---- Copyright 2010 - 2016 Econintersect LLC - all rights reserved