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posted on 11 May 2016

In October 2015, 69.2 Percent Of 2015 High School Graduates Enrolled In College

from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

In October 2015, 69.2 percent of 2015 high school graduates were enrolled in colleges or universities. Recent high school graduates not enrolled in college were about twice as likely as enrolled graduates to be working or looking for work (72.7 percent compared with 36.0 percent).

Information on school enrollment and work activity is collected monthly in the Current Population Survey (CPS), a nationwide survey of about 60,000 households that provides information on employment and unemployment. Each October, a supplement to the CPS gathers more detailed information about school enrollment, such as full- and part-time enrollment status. Additional information about the October supplement is included in the Technical Note.

Recent High School Graduates and Dropouts

Of the 3.0 million youth age 16 to 24 who graduated from high school between January and October 2015, about 2.1 million (69.2 percent) were enrolled in college in October. The college enrollment rate of recent high school graduates in October 2015 was little different from the rate in October 2014 (68.4 percent). For 2015 high school graduates, the college enrollment rate was 72.6 percent for young women and 65.8 percent for young men. The college enrollment rate of recent Asian (83.0 percent) graduates was higher than for their White (71.1 percent), Hispanic (68.9 percent), and Black (54.6 percent) counterparts. (See table 1.)

The labor force participation rate (the proportion of the population working or looking for work) for recent high school graduates enrolled in college was 36.0 percent in October 2015. The participation rates for male and female graduates enrolled in college were 37.9 percent and 34.3 percent, respectively.

Among recent high school graduates enrolled in college in October 2015, about 9 in 10 were full-time students. Recent graduates enrolled as full-time students were about half as likely to be in the labor force (32.9 percent) as were their peers enrolled part time (69.3 percent).

About 2 in 3 recent high school graduates enrolled in college attended 4-year colleges. Of these students, 29.5 percent participated in the labor force, compared with 47.3 percent of recent graduates enrolled in 2-year colleges.

Recent high school graduates not enrolled in college in the fall of 2015 were much more likely than enrolled graduates to be in the labor force (72.7 percent compared with 36.0 percent). The unemployment rate for recent high school graduates not enrolled in college was 20.7 percent, higher than the rate of 12.6 percent for recent graduates enrolled in college.

Between October 2014 and October 2015, 521,000 young people dropped out of high school. The labor force participation rate for recent dropouts (45.9 percent) was much lower than for recent high school graduates not enrolled in college (72.7 percent). The jobless rate for recent high school dropouts was 19.8 percent, similar to the rate for recent high school graduates not enrolled in college (20.7 percent).

All Youth Enrolled in High School or College

In October 2015, 57.0 percent of the nation's 16- to -24 year olds, or 21.9 million young people, were enrolled in high school (9.6 million) or in college (12.3 million). The labor force participation rate (36.2 percent) of youth enrolled in school was down from October 2014 to October 2015. The unemployment rate for this group (8.8 percent) was also down over the year.

In October 2015, college students continued to be more likely to participate in the labor force than high school students (47.7 percent compared with 21.3 percent). Those attending college full time had a much lower labor force participation rate than did part-time students (42.5 percent versus 79.9 percent). For high school and college students, Asians were less likely to participate in the labor force than Blacks, Whites, or Hispanics. Female college students were more likely to be in the labor force (49.8 percent) than their male counterparts (45.4 percent). Labor force participation rates for female and male high school students were similar (22.5 percent and 20.2 percent, respectively).

The unemployment rate for high school students, at 14.6 percent in October 2015, was more than twice the rate for college students (6.8 percent). Unemployment rates were higher for high school students than for college students for Blacks, Whites, and Hispanics.

All Youth Not Enrolled in School

In October 2015, 16.5 million persons age 16 to 24 were not enrolled in school. The labor force participation rate of youth not enrolled in school increased over the year from 78.9 percent to 80.1 percent. Among youth not enrolled in school in October 2015, young men continued to be more likely than young women to participate in the labor force--84.1 percent compared with 75.7 percent. Labor force participation rates for not-enrolled men and women were highest for those with a bachelor's degree or higher (95.5 percent and 92.3 percent, respectively) and lowest for men and women with less than a high school diploma (65.5 percent and 44.6 percent, respectively).

The unemployment rate for youth age 16 to 24 not enrolled in school declined over the year from 13.7 percent to 11.7 percent. Among not-enrolled youth who did not have a high school diploma, unemployment rates in October 2015 were 27.0 percent for young men and 22.6 percent for young women. In contrast, the jobless rates of young men and women with at least a bachelor's degree were 4.5 percent and 7.7 percent, respectively. Black youth not enrolled in school had an unemployment rate of 21.6 percent in October 2015, higher than the rates for their White (9.5 percent), Asian (6.5 percent), and Hispanic (12.8 percent) counterparts.

Source

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/hsgec.pdf

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