econintersect.com
       
  

FREE NEWSLETTER: Econintersect sends a nightly newsletter highlighting news events of the day, and providing a summary of new articles posted on the website. Econintersect will not sell or pass your email address to others per our privacy policy. You can cancel this subscription at any time by selecting the unsubscribing link in the footer of each email.



posted on 10 October 2015

Investor Alert: Identity Theft, Data Breaches And Your Investment Accounts

from the Securities and Exchange Commission

The SEC's Office of Investor Education and Advocacy is issuing this Investor Alert to provide investors with important steps to take regarding their investment accounts if they become victims of identity theft or a data breach. Investors should always take steps to safeguard their personal financial information (e.g., social security number, financial account numbers, phone number, e-mail address, or usernames and passwords for online financial accounts). However, if identity theft or a data breach compromises your personal financial information, here are some important steps to take immediately.

Contact your investment firm and other financial institutions immediately. If you think your personal financial information has been stolen, contact your broker-dealer, investment adviser or other financial professional immediately to report the problem. You should also contact any other financial institutions where you have accounts that may be impacted by the loss of your personal financial information. These may include banks, credit card companies, or insurance companies. Please remember to document any conversations with your investment or financial firms in writing.

Change your online account passwords. Immediately change the password for any investment or financial accounts associated with the compromised personal financial information. Always remember to use strong passwords that are not easy to guess, consisting of at least eight or more characters that include symbols, numbers and both capital and lowercase letters.

Consider closing compromised accounts. If you notice any unauthorized access into your investment account, you may want to ask your investment firm to close the account and move the assets to a new account. You should consult your investment firm about the best way to handle closing an account, if you choose to do so.

Activate two-step verification, if available. Your brokerage firm or investment adviser may offer a two-step verification process for gaining access to your online accounts. With a two-step verification process, each time anyone attempts to log into your account through an unrecognized device (i.e., a device you have not previously authorized on the account), your investment firm sends a unique code to either your e-mail or cell phone. Before anyone can gain access to your account, they must enter this code and your password. Activating this added layer of security may help reduce the risk of unauthorized access to your accounts by identity thieves.

Monitor your investment accounts for suspicious activity. Closely monitor your investment accounts for any suspicious activity. Look out for any changes to your account information that you do not recognize (e.g., a change to your address, phone number, e-mail address, account number, or external banking information). You should also confirm that you authorized all of the transactions that appear in your account statements and trade confirmations. If you find any suspicious activity, immediately report it to your investment firm. Please remember to document any conversations with your investment firm in writing and provide a copy to your investment firm.

Place a fraud alert on your credit file. Placing an initial fraud alert in your credit file provides notice to potential creditors (e.g., banks and credit card companies) that you may have been a victim of fraud or identity theft and will help reduce the risk that an identity thief can use your personal financial information to open new accounts. Contact any of the three credit bureaus listed below and ask them to add an initial fraud alert to your credit file.

Experian

Transunion

Equifax

1-888-397-3742

www.experian.com

1-800-680-7289

www.transunion.com

1-800-525-6285

www.equifax.com

You only need to contact one of the credit bureaus to add the alert to your credit file at all three credit bureaus. The credit bureau you contact will notify the other bureaus about the alert. The initial fraud alert will last for 90 days, and can be renewed every 90 days. Requesting an initial fraud alert and renewing the alert are both free.

Active duty members of the military may elect to add an "active duty alert" to their credit file. Active duty alerts are the same as initial fraud alert except they last for 12 months.

If you have been a victim of identity theft, you may also consider placing an extended fraud alert or credit freeze in your credit file. An extended fraud alert is similar to an initial fraud alert except that it lasts for seven years. A credit freeze stops any new creditors from accessing your credit file until you remove the credit freeze from your credit file. Since most businesses will not open new credit accounts without checking your credit report, a freeze can stop identity thieves from opening new accounts in your name, but it does not stop them from taking over existing accounts. For additional information on extended fraud alerts and credit freezes, please visit the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) identity theft website at www.identitytheft.gov.

Monitor your credit reports. After you place an initial fraud alert in your credit file, you are entitled to obtain a free copy of your credit report from each of the credit bureaus. Check each of your reports for signs of fraud, such as an unknown account, a credit check or inquiry to your credit file that you do not know about, an employer you have never worked for, or unfamiliar personal information.

Consider creating an Identity Theft Report. If a breach in your personal financial information results in identity theft, you may want to consider creating an identity theft report. An Identity Theft Report helps you deal with credit reporting companies, debt collectors, and business that opened accounts in your name. You can use the report to:

· Get fraudulent information removed from your credit report

· Stop a company from collecting debts that result from identity theft

· Place an extended fraud alert on your credit report

· Get information from companies about accounts the identity thief opened or misused.

Creating an Identity Theft Report involves three steps:

1. Report the identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by completing the FTC's online complaint form at https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or by calling the FTC at 1-877-438-4338, and obtain an FTC Identity Theft Affidavit. If you decide to use the FTC's online complaint form, please remember to print out your completed form before leaving the website since you will be unable to retrieve it once you leave the FTC's website.

2. Contact your local police department about the identity theft and provide them with:

· A copy of your FTC Identity Theft Affidavit

· A government-issued ID with a photo

· Proof of your address (mortgage statement, rental agreement, or utilities bill)

· Any other evidence you have of the identity theft (bills, IRS notices, etc.)

· A copy of the FTC's Memo to Law Enforcement on identity theft

Ask for a copy of the police report.

3. Attach your FTC Identity Theft Affidavit to your police report to make an Identity Theft Report.

Additional information on Identity Theft Reports and identity theft in general, is available on the FTC's website at www.identitytheft.gov.

Document all communications in writing. Remember to document, in writing, and keep copies of any communications you have related to your identity theft.

Related Information

For additional educational information for investors, see the SEC's Office of Investor Education and Advocacy's homepage and the SEC's Investor.gov website. For additional information about safeguarding online investment accounts, data breaches and identity theft, also see:


The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy has provided this information as a service to investors. It is neither a legal interpretation nor a statement of SEC policy. If you have questions concerning the meaning or application of a particular law or rule, please consult with an attorney who specializes in securities law.

>>>>> Scroll down to view and make comments <<<<<<

Click here for Historical News Post Listing










Make a Comment

Econintersect wants your comments, data and opinion on the articles posted.  As the internet is a "war zone" of trolls, hackers and spammers - Econintersect must balance its defences against ease of commenting.  We have joined with Livefyre to manage our comment streams.

To comment, using Livefyre just click the "Sign In" button at the top-left corner of the comment box below. You can create a commenting account using your favorite social network such as Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn or Open ID - or open a Livefyre account using your email address.



You can also comment using Facebook directly using he comment block below.





Econintersect Contributors


search_box

Print this page or create a PDF file of this page
Print Friendly and PDF


The growing use of ad blocking software is creating a shortfall in covering our fixed expenses. Please consider a donation to Econintersect to allow continuing output of quality and balanced financial and economic news and analysis.


Take a look at what is going on inside of Econintersect.com
Main Home
Analysis Blog
The Problem With Obamacare Is That It Did Little To Reduce Overall Healthcare Spending
Joan Robinson’s Critique of Marginal Utility Theory
News Blog
Most Women Inventors Come From America
Earnings And Economic Reports: Week Starting 12 December 2016
The U.S. Is Home To The Most Unicorns
Why Britain's Public Finances Will Suffer If Brexit Reduces Migration
Working From Home Is Still Rare In The United States
What We Read Today 10 December 2016
The Last Bucket Catch
Joe Sixpack's Situation in 3Q2016: The Average Joe Is Better Off
Why Are Some People More Delinquent On Loans Than Others? - Part 1
Gravity Returns To San Francisco Housing Market
Violent Bond Selloff: An Eye-Opening Perspective
Infographic Of The Day: Identity Theft: You Should Be Worried
Early Headlines: Russia Hacked GOP, Trump To Drain Energy 'Swamp'?, New Sec'y Of State Candidate, India IP Shrinks, India Has World's New Largest Solar Plant , China GDP Hides Volatility And More
Investing Blog
Natural Gas Prices Are Headed Higher In 2017
The New Art Of Utility Investing
Opinion Blog
The US Has A Regime-Uncertainty Problem
Trickle-down Economics, Trump Edition
Precious Metals Blog
Silver Prices Rebounded Today: Where They Are Headed
Live Markets
09Dec2016 Market Close: Wall Street Closes On A New High, Trump Sugar High, Crude Prices Testing Resistance, US Dollar Melts Higher
Amazon Books & More






.... and keep up with economic news using our dynamic economic newspapers with the largest international coverage on the internet
Asia / Pacific
Europe
Middle East / Africa
Americas
USA Government



Crowdfunding ....






























 navigate econintersect.com

Blogs

Analysis Blog
News Blog
Investing Blog
Opinion Blog
Precious Metals Blog
Markets Blog
Video of the Day
Weather

Newspapers

Asia / Pacific
Europe
Middle East / Africa
Americas
USA Government
     

RSS Feeds / Social Media

Combined Econintersect Feed
Google+
Facebook
Twitter
Digg

Free Newsletter

Marketplace - Books & More

Economic Forecast

Content Contribution

Contact

About

  Top Economics Site

Investing.com Contributor TalkMarkets Contributor Finance Blogs Free PageRank Checker Active Search Results Google+

This Web Page by Steven Hansen ---- Copyright 2010 - 2016 Econintersect LLC - all rights reserved