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What We Read Today 20 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

Too Big to Tax: Settlements Are Tax Write-Offs for Banks (Lynnley Browning, Newsweek)  Hat tip to Rob Carter.  The settlements agreed to by the big banks in compensation for fraud they have committed are not what they seem.  The are,in fact, tax deductions.  They are treated very much as would business expenses, deducted from taxable income.  So the assertion that banks are treating the settlements as a cost of doing business is in fact, well, a fact.

Facebook’s Popularity Among Teens Dips Again (Sarah Frier, Bloomberg)  In 2012 95% of 13-27 year-olds using social media were Facebook members,  In 2013 it was 94% and this year down to 88%.  What is gaining?  Twitter and messaging apps.


Superiority or Elitism? The Standing of Economics in the Social Sciences (Alan Harvey, Institute for Dynamic Economic Analysis)  Alan Harvey has contributed to GEI.  See also the next article. Here are two excerpts from his conclusion:

The summary image is of an insular profession, guarded by a tribal hierarchy, dominated by a few schools, which adheres to a narrow ideology, and teaches largely the same material. Economists have achieved a place of prominence and influence in the world unmatched by other social sciences, and in this position of superiority have declined to engage in a wider discussion. Many will recognize this image as applying also within economics, where devastating critiques go unacknowledged, bad practices go unchanged and self-confidence is unchecked. 
 
The final irony is that a whole institutional structure – from newspapers through congressional committees to international policy circles – looks to economists for answers in crisis, even when they have been proven wrong.

....

When compensation, prestige and tribal discipline replace results and intellectual debate, we have a reform that cannot be won on scientific terms. 

The Superiority of Economists (Marion Fourcade, Etienne Ollion, and Yann Algan, Max Planck Sciences Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Societies)  This is a research study with real data.  For example, a table on interdisciplinary attitudes of social scientists is shown below.  But the most interesting (and insightful) part of the entire paper is the conclusion:

If economists could manage to get themselves thought of as humble, competent people, on a level with dentists, that would be splendid!,” Keynes (1963[1932]: 373) famously wrote. Most modern economists have a strong practical bent. They believe in the ideal of an expert-advised democracy, in which their competence would be utilized and on display in high profile, non-elective positions in government and other institutions. But democratic societies are deeply suspicious of (non-democratic) expertise, and economic advice, unlike dentistry, can never be humble. The fact is that – in some ways true to its philosophical origins – economics is a very moral science after all. Unlike atoms and molecules, the “objects” upon which economists seek to act have a perspective on the world, too. Human life is messy, never to be grasped in its full complexity or shaped according to a plan: people act in unanticipated ways, politics makes its own demands, cultures (which economists do not understand well) resist. Thus the very real success of economists in establishing their professional dominion also inevitably throws them into the rough and tumble of democratic politics, forcing them to try to manage a hazardous intimacy with economic, political, and administrative power. It takes a lot of self-confidence to put forward decisive expert claims in that context. That confidence is perhaps the greatest achievement of the economics profession – but it is also its most vulnerable trait, its Achilles heel.

interdisiplinary-attitudes-social-science


Articles about events, conflicts and disease around the world

Ferguson and Related News

NSA / CIA

Ebola

Turkey

Iraq

Ukraine

Belarus

Russia

Pakistan

North Korea

Cuba




What We Read Today 19 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

The Troll Hunters (Adrian Chen, MIT Technology Review)  Hate is having a sort of renaissance online, even in the countries thought to be beyond it.  This article reports on a group of vigilantes doing investigative research "to expose racists, creeps, and hypocrites".   The author asks:  "Have they gone too far?"


BOJ Keeps Record Easing as Oil’s Fall Challenges Kuroda   (Toru Fujioka and Masahiro Hidaka, Bloomberg)  Year-over-year inflation rose less than 1% in October, slipping further below the 2% inflation rate that is targeted by the Bank of Japan (BoJ).  While the sharp decline in oil prices in recent months is a boon to businesses and consumers, it is a component of the CPI softening and helps to keep a ”deflationary mindset” in place.  As a result the BoJ is keeping the monetary easing spigots open full bore.  A measure of the battle for the BoJ is the bond market expectation for future inflation which is now down to an average of 0.84% per year for the next ten years.


China 2013 GDP revision won't affect growth this year (Kevin Yao, Reuters)  China has revised the GDP numbers for prior years and, as a result, the country’s GDP was 3.4% larger last year than previously reported.  The bulk of the increase occurred in the service sector.  The government report stated that the GDP growth reports thus far in 2014 will not be effected (presumably because the service sector data reported this year already included any methodology changes now being applied to prior years.  It remains to be seen how the GDP growth numbers for recent years will be changed once the revisions are complete.  Econintersect suggests it is likely that only a small part of the added 3.4% increase in 2013 will actually be applied to 2013 GDP growth – the bulk of the change will likely be applied to the Chinese economy spli up over a number of years.


Ferguson and Related News

NSA / CIA

Ebola

Nigeria

Israel

Syria

Iraq

Ukraine

  • The Other War in Ukraine (Christian Caryl, Foreign Policy)  The biggest threat to Ukraine isn’t Vladimir Putin: it’s a deeply entrenched culture of corruption. Can the new government cope?

Russia

North Korea

Pakistan

Cuba




What We Read Today 18 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

Obama Announces U.S. and Cuba Will Resume Relations (Peter Baker, The New York Times)  After a year and a half of talks, hosted by Canada and encouraged by Pope Francis, the United States and Cuba will restore diplomatic relations for the first time since they were abandoned by the Eisenhower administration in January 1960.  For more details see articles in the reading list below.

Drought situation improves slightly, but water shortage remains (Hata El Nasser, Al Jazeera)  December rains has helped but there is still a long way top go for drought-stricken California.  It would take 50% more than the normal average precipitation or about 75 inches of rainfall (or snow equivalent) over the next several months to end the drought conditions.  The above normal rainfall for December has totaled up to 19 inches so far with another 1-3 inches expected in the next day or two.  So there is a long way to go.


McSally win gives GOP historic majority in House (Sean Sullivan, The Washington Post)  Republicans clinched their 247th U.S. House seat on Wednesday when GOP challenger Martha McSally officially defeated Rep. Ron Barber (D-Ariz.) after a recount. Republicans will begin the 114th Congress with a 247-188 advantage over Democrats in the House of Representatives. It is the largest GOP majority since Republicans claimed 270 seats in the 1928 election.

Articles about events, conflicts and disease around the world

Ferguson and Related News

NSA / CIA

Ebola

Russia (more 'behind the wall')

Pakistan

Cuba

Mexico




What We Read Today 17 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

Falling prices of oil and the impact on the global and domestic economy (Peter Morici, Al Jazeera)  Collapsing oil prices have driven gasoline prices for regular under $2 a gallon in 13 states.  While this is a windfall to airllines, travelers and consumers in general, it has an economic cost yo others, notably oil producers and their suppliers.  Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland, discusses the economic gains and losses on Al Jazeera TV.

Click to watch video.
oil-price-decline-morici-al-jazeera-video


2015 Standard Mileage Rates (IRS Notice 2014-79)

  • 57.5 cents per mile for business miles driven (up from 56 cents in 2014)
  • 23 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes (down half a cent from 2014)
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations (fixed by Congress, never adjusted for inflation)

Kelly Phillips, Forbes, explains why the mileage rates appear to be inconsistent.  It’s because different formulas are prescribed by law for each driving category:

If you’re wondering about the difference in the rates for business and medical or moving purposes, there’s a reason: the standard mileage rate for business is calculated using an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile, including depreciation, insurance, repairs, tires, maintenance, gas and oil while the rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs, such as gas and oil. That also explains why the rate for medical or moving purposes has dipped while the rate for business has gone up. Inflation is edging costs – other than gas – up a tiny bit.

Note:  Taxpayers have the option of deducting actual expenses rather than the mileage rates allowed.  In many cases the extra work involved in record keeping and accounting is more than an additional tax deduction would make worthwhile.


Articles about events, conflicts and disease around the world

Ferguson and Related News

Israel

Palestine

Syria

Russia

Greece

Norway

  • Norway's Oil Decline Accelerates (Worldpress.org)  Country with well-managed (lack of) dependency on oil revenues reacts quickly to collapsing prices with new oil projects being scrapped.

Pakistan

Afghanistan




What We Read Today 16 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

IMF, World Bank Halt Lending to Ukraine – Franklin Templeton $4 Billion Ukraine Bet Goes Bad (Yves Smith, Naked Capitalism)  Yves Smith has contributed to GEI.  This is a great breakdown of just what the fiscal and economic siutuation is in Ukraine.  If you don't like seeing the entrails of a country spread out on the ground you may not want to read this.  If that concerns you we recommend you suck it up and read this all the way through.  The situation is worse than you could have imagined.

Sydney siege: Two hostages and gunman dead after heavily armed police storm Lindt cafe in Martin Place (Sydney Morning Herald)  The hostage situation at Sydney's Lindt Chocolate Cafe in Martin Place has ended in the early hours Tuesday morning (16 December 2014) with the 50-year-old gunman dead and two hostages killed, a man aged 34 and a woman aged 38.  The hostage taker was identified as Iranian cleric Man Haron Monis.  He had taken 17 people hostage around 10 am Monday, but at least five of them were released or escaped during the seige which lasted approximately 16 hours.


Profile: Man Haron Monis (BBC News)   Man Haron Monis was a self-styled Muslim cleric was born in Iran and sought political asylum in Australia in 1996.  He was facing more than 40 sexual and indecent assault charges and was currently on bail for being an accessory to the murder of his ex-wife.  According to the Sydney Morning Herald he "allegedly spent [time] as a self-proclaimed "spiritual healer" who dealt with so-called black magic at a premises in western Sydney."  The following video shows Monis reading a sympathy letter in 2010.
man-haron-monis-video

Articles about events, conflicts and disease around the world

Ferguson and Related News

NSA / CIA

Ebola

Nigeria

Libya

Syria

Iraq

Iran

Israel

Russia

India

Pakistan

China




What We Read Today 15 December 2014

Econintersect: Every day our editors collect the most interesting things they find from around the internet and present a summary "reading list" which will include very brief summaries (and sometimes longer ones) of why each item has gotten our attention. Suggestions from readers for "reading list" items are gratefully reviewed, although sometimes space limits the number included.

Japan's ruling party wins in landslide victory (Associated Press, Al Jazeera)  Japan's ruling coalition won big in Sunday's lower house elections, returning the party of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to power and ensuring the continuation of reforms aimed at lifting the country's economy out of its two-decade funk.  With 61% of the seats the Liberal Democrats have a comfortable margin over an array of smaller parties, even more secure because they have a ruling coalition with the Komei party which gathered another 7% of the lower house seats.  The results appear to assure the continuation of the economic reform policies known familiarly as 'Abenomics'. 

Abe's coalition secures big Japan election win with record low turnout (Linda Seig and Kiyoshi Takenaka, Reuters)  Record low turnout may suggest that Japan's voters may not have been very enthusiastic about returning Abe to power.  This article even says the "record low turnout pointed to broad dissatisfaction with his performance".  Abe's party actually won 4 fewer seats than it held since the previous election.  The turnout for this election is 52.4%.  In 2012 the turnout was 59.3%.


BOJ Said to Reject Adding Stimulus to Ease Blow to CPI From Oil (Toru Fujioka and Masahiro Hidaka, Bloomberg)  Policy makers feel that while cheaper energy costs may weigh on consumer prices for a time (Japan is trying to drive up inflation), they ultimately will boost the economy and therefore will spur inflation.

Articles about events, conflicts and disease around the world

Ferguson and Related News

NSA / CIA

Ebola

Syria

Ukraine

Russia

Hong Kong

Greece

Mexico




Full list of posts:

What We Read Today 20 December 2014
What We Read Today 19 December 2014
What We Read Today 18 December 2014
What We Read Today 17 December 2014
What We Read Today 16 December 2014
What We Read Today 15 December 2014
What We Read Today 14 December 2014
What We Read Today 13 December 2014
What We Read Today 12 December 2014
What We Read Today 11 December 2014
What We Read Today 10 December 2014
What We Read Today 09 December 2014
What We Read Today 08 December 2014
What We Read Today 07 December 2014

What We Read Today 06 December 2014


What We Read Today 05 December 2014
What We Read Today 04 December 2014
What We Read Today 03 December 2014
What We Read Today 02 December 2014
What We Read Today 01 December 2014
What We Read Today 30 November 2014
What We Read Today 29 November 2014
What We Read Today 28 November 2014
What We Read Today 27 November 2014
What We Read Today 26 November 2014
What We Read Today 25 November 2014
What We Read Today 24 November 2014
What We Read Today 23 November 2014
What We Read Today 22 November 2014
What We Read Today 21 November 2014

What We Read Today 19 November 2014
What We Read Today 18 November 2014
What We Read Today 17 November 2014
What We Read Today 16 November 2014
What We Read Today 15 November 2014
What We Read Today 14 November 2014
What We Read Today 12 November 2014
What We Read Today 11 November 2014
What We Read Today 10 November 2014
What We Read Today 09 November 2014
What We Read Today 08 October 2014
What We Read Today 07 November 2014
What We Read Today 06 November 2014

What We Read Today 04 November 2014
What We Read Today 03 November 2014
What We Read Today 02 November 2014
What We Read Today 01 November 2014
What We Read Today 31 October 2014
What We Read Today 30 October 2014
What We Read Today 30 October 2014
What We Read Today 29 October 2014
What We Read Today 28 October 2014
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What We Read Today 25 October 2014
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What We Read Today 15 October 2014
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What We Read Today 30 September 2014
What We Read Today 29 September 2014: Special Edition
What We Read Today 26 September 2014
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