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Book Review: Capital in the Twenty-First Century

May 1st, 2014
in Op Ed

Piketty's Regressive Views on Public Debt and the Potential Impact of His Book

by Philip Pilkington

Piketty's Wikipedia page says that he's a Keynesian. Well, I don't see it at all. His book contains a section on the public debt in historical perspective and it is desperately misinformed.

A caveat first though: I actually like Piketty's book in a lot of ways. While not extremely well written, it is highly readable (if you are an historical data sort of person). And it is very nice to see what is effectively a work of economic history get so much play. Because economists should be far more interested in reality than in modelling and this book could spur that interest.

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The Fed’s Deadly Error

May 1st, 2014
in Op Ed

Penalties For Labor And Thrift; Windfalls For Speculation In Land And Financial Assets

by Lee Adler, Wall Street Examiner

There's no law that says the stock market can't have a major correction when central banks are pumping money into the system via the Primary Dealers. But in the 12 years since the Fed began publishing detailed data on its operations, and since I began observing those operations closely, the correlations between central bank liquidity flows and market movements have been undeniable. So I continue to feel that there will not be a major correction in stocks until the Fed and its cohorts are forced to change course.

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Habitable Exoplanets are Bad News for Humanity

May 1st, 2014
in Op Ed

by Andrew Snyder-Beattie, The Conversation

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth orbiting in the “habitable zone” – the distance from a star in which we might expect liquid water, and perhaps life.

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Wall Street Greed: Not Too Big for a California Jury

April 30th, 2014
in Op Ed

by Ellen Brown, Web of Debt

Sixteen of the world's largest banks have been caught colluding to rig global interest rates. Why are we doing business with a corrupt global banking cartel?

United States Attorney General Eric Holder has declared that the too-big-to-fail Wall Street banks are too big to prosecute. But an outraged California jury might have different ideas. As noted in the California legal newspaper The Daily Journal:

California juries are not bashful - they have been known to render massive punitive damages awards that dwarf the award of compensatory (actual) damages.For example, in one securities fraud case jurors awarded $5.7 million in compensatory damages and $165 million in punitive damages. . . . And in a tobacco case with $5.5 million in compensatory damages, the jury awarded $3 billion in punitive damages . . . .

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The New Book on Regulation I Just Decided to Write: Blame it on Monaco

April 30th, 2014
in Op Ed

by William K. Black, New Economic Perspectives

This is the third article in a series of columns devoted to financial regulation prompted by the comments of a Swiss academic at the XIIth Annual CIFA Forum in Monaco. (See first here and second here.)

Having spent 20 years as a non-academic professional, I still find it odd the directions in which a single speaker or writer can start an academic on a convoluted path of research that spans multiple disciplines and eras and produces a series of “light bulb” analytical moments. And that prompts a digression into a symptom of the problem illuminated by that series of moments that has led me to decide to write a book on regulation.

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