>

We Still Don't Have a Good Way to Measure Global Corruption

September 8th, 2014
in Op Ed

by Paul Heywood and Jonathan Rose, The Conversation

Corruption is an urgent global problem, one that cosats the developing world dearly and badly slows its development down. But until recently, figuring out just how big the problem is, and what to do about it, has been fiendishly difficult.

Read more »

Is There Capitalism After Cronyism?

September 8th, 2014
in Op Ed

by Charles Hugh Smith, Of Two Minds

The more the Status Quo pursues the same old Keynesian Cargo Cult script of central planning and free money for financiers, the more self-liquidating the system becomes.

Judging by the mainstream media, the most pressing problems facing capitalism are:

  1. income inequality, the basis of Thomas Piketty's bestseller Capital in the Twenty-First Century, and
  2. the failure of laissez-faire markets to regulate their excesses, a common critique encapsulated by Paul Craig Roberts' recent book The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism.

Read more »

Koruda: BoJ Should Set Benchmark for Wage Negotiations

September 7th, 2014
in Op Ed

by Dirk Ehnts, Econoblog101

Reuters reports from the Jackson Hole conference of late August, writing that the Bank of Japan’s governor Kuroda has proposed to set benchmarks for wage negotiations:

Low long-term interest rates will likely not rise until the 2 percent target is reached, he said, adding that the BoJ’s 2 percent inflation target, once met, could serve as a benchmark for wage negotiations.

Read more »

Rethinking Japan’s “Lost Decades”

September 6th, 2014
in Op Ed

by Peter St. Onge , mises.org

One of the great economic myths of our time is Japan's "lost decades." As Japan doubles-down on inflationary stimulus, it's worth reviewing the facts.

The truth is that the Japanese and US economies have performed in lock-step since 2000, and their performances have matched each other going as far back as 1980.

Either Japan's not in crisis, or the US has been in crisis for a good thirty-five years. You can't have it both ways.

Read more »

Why Do Sovereigns Borrow Bank Money?

September 6th, 2014
in Op Ed

by J.D. Alt, New Economic Perspectives

Why do so many people-including the authors of most economics textbooks-believe the U.S. banking system creates the U.S. dollars we earn and spend and pay our taxes with? It's because the U.S. banking system does, in fact, "issue" the great majority of the dollars we use-by making loans to businesses and citizens which are not backed by "real" dollars the banks have on deposit. What everyone overlooks, however (for reasons not entirely clear) is the fact that these new loan dollars are "made real" by the U.S. government's solemn promise to convert them at any time, on demand, into actual, "real", sovereign U.S. dollars. The U.S. government is able to make this promise because, by law, it can issue the necessary actual dollars by fiat (by simply "declaring" the dollars into existence.) A lot of people (again for reasons not entirely clear) don't like to hear that last part. But it's simply a fact of life: the cash dollar bills you get from an ATM machine are not printed up (created) by the banks-they are printed (or created electronically as needed) ONLY by the U.S. sovereign government.

Read more »





<< Previous Page 1 ... 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 ... 419 Next Page >>



 navigate econintersect.com

Blogs

Analysis Blog
Econintersect Features
News Blog
Investing Blog
Opinion Blog
Precious Metals Blog
Live Market Commentary
Video of the Day
Weather

Newspapers

Asia / Pacific
Europe
Middle East / Africa
Americas
USA Government
Live Market Conditions
     

RSS Feeds / Social Media

Combined Econintersect Feed
Google+
Facebook
Twitter
Digg

Free Newsletter

Marketplace - Books & More

Economic Forecast

Content Contribution

Contact

About

  Top Economics Site

Investing.com Contributor TalkMarkets Contributor Finance Blogs Free PageRank Checker Active Search Results Google+

This Web Page by Steven Hansen ---- Copyright 2010 - 2015 Econintersect LLC - all rights reserved