Effectiveness of Pre-Purchase Homeownership Counseling and Financial Management Skills

June 25th, 2014
in econ_news

from the Philadelphia Fed

Homeownership represents many things to many people. For some, the home is the focal point of the family unit, the place where cherished memories are enjoyed, from raising children to celebrating special family occasions. For others, it represents the foundation of their financial investments and serves as the basis for accumulating potential wealth in the future. Yet for many, particularly those with low and moderate incomes, it is the elusive linchpin of the American dream. Perhaps the major barrier to the benefits of homeownership for many with low and moderate incomes is past credit problems, which are often aggravated by deficient financial management skills.

Follow up:

In addition, many people are intimidated by the mortgage-lending process, stemming from their lack of knowledge of its inner workings. Many people maintain that homeownership counseling is available to navigate a number of the aforementioned impediments. However, the effectiveness of such counseling over time continues to be debated. Previous studies have made important strides in understanding the value of homeownership counseling, but more work is still needed. More specifically, two researchers (Michael Collins and Collin O’Rourke, 2011), who are familiar with studies on the subject, have observed that “homeownership education and counseling have never been rigorously evaluated through a randomized field experiment.”

The Community Development Studies and Education Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, with the assistance of Abt Associates, a consulting firm, and Clarifi, a nonprofit counseling agency, conducted a study structured to address the concerns raised about previous efforts that examined the effectiveness of homeownership counseling received by first-time homebuyers. In particular, the study employed an experimental design, in which participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment or control group and followed for several years after they had received assistance. Those assigned to the control group received a two-hour homebuyer’s workshop and no other services, while those in the treatment group received the homebuyer’s workshop as well as one-on-one counseling. Additional information was gathered to support the estimates that gauged the creditworthiness of the study participants over time. The study provides valuable insight on the influence of counseling on credit scores, total debt, and delinquencies in payments.

The key findings are as follows:

  • This study improves upon previous research by using an experimental design with participants (only first-time homebuyers) who were randomly assigned to a treatment or control group. This allowed us to counter “selection bias” directly on the part of study participants.
  • The two-hour pre-purchase homeownership workshop and one-on-one pre-purchase counseling benefited those who later became homeowners and improved the financial creditworthiness of those who did not.
  • The benefits of pre-purchase homeownership counseling and money management assistance for the treatment participants who received one-on-one counseling were generally greater in terms of credit scores, total debt, and various delinquency days on payments relative to control participants.
  • Both treatment participants with one-on-one counseling and control participants who became homeowners tended to pay their mortgages in a timely manner overall.
  • [click on image below to read the complete study]

    Source: http://www.philadelphiafed.org/community-development/homeownership-counseling-study/2014/homeownership-counseling-study-042014.pdf

    Make a Comment

    Econintersect wants your comments, data and opinion on the articles posted.  As the internet is a "war zone" of trolls, hackers and spammers - Econintersect must balance its defences against ease of commenting.  We have joined with Livefyre to manage our comment streams.

    To comment, just click the "Sign In" button at the top-left corner of the comment box below. You can create a commenting account using your favorite social network such as Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn or Open ID - or open a Livefyre account using your email address.

     navigate econintersect.com


    Analysis Blog
    News Blog
    Investing Blog
    Opinion Blog
    Precious Metals Blog
    Markets Blog
    Video of the Day


    Asia / Pacific
    Middle East / Africa
    USA Government

    RSS Feeds / Social Media

    Combined Econintersect Feed

    Free Newsletter

    Marketplace - Books & More

    Economic Forecast

    Content Contribution



      Top Economics Site

    Investing.com Contributor TalkMarkets Contributor Finance Blogs Free PageRank Checker Active Search Results Google+

    This Web Page by Steven Hansen ---- Copyright 2010 - 2016 Econintersect LLC - all rights reserved