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What We Read Today 29 August 2013

August 29th, 2013
in econ_news, syndication

Econintersect: Click Read more >> below graphic to see today's list.


The top of today's reading list reports on the potential for replacing bulky, heavy batteries with capactitors ........ and the last article reviews the status of global current account imbalances today compared to the crisis year of 2008.

Follow up:

  • The Last Mystery of the Financial Crisis (Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone) "It's long been suspected that ratings agencies like Moody's and Standard & Poor's helped trigger the meltdown. A new trove of embarrassing documents shows how they did it."
  • What Determines the Return on Gold? (Yichuan Wang, Not Quite Noahpinion) It is not inflation as commonly thought. But vs. real interest rates there is a clear correlation. That is when you get paid to hold gold vs. money at interest.

Click on graph for larger image.
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New-homes-sales-vs-builder-optimism-sober-look-2013-aug

  • Ripping Off Young America: The College-Loan Scandal (Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone) "The federal government has made it easier than ever to borrow money for higher education - saddling a generation with crushing debts and inflating a bubble that could bring down the economy."
  • A Forensic Analysis of Global Imbalances (Menzie Chinn, Barry Eichengreen and Hiro Ito, NBER Working Paper No. 17513) Menzie Chinn and Barry Eichengreen have contributed to Global Economic Intersection. "The prospects for the world economy remain murky at best. Yet it is not too early to examine the question whether global imbalances, specifically large current account deficits and surpluses, were important causes of the financial crisis of 2008."

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